Coconut and raspberry marshmallows

Coconut and raspberry marshmallows
  • Serves icon Cuts into around 40 squares
  • Time icon Hands-on time 45 min, plus 2-3 hours cooling

Sweet, sticky and light-as-air – make a jar of these grown-up raspberry marshmallows and you’ll be a welcomed guest at any party.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
92kcals
Fat
1.2 (1g saturated)
Protein
0.9 g
Carbohydrates
19.2 (16.7g sugars)
Fibre
0.6g
Calories
92kcals
Fat
1.2 (1g saturated)
Protein
0.9 g
Carbohydrates
19.2 (16.7g sugars)
Fibre
0.6g

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil for greasing
  • 100g each cornflour and icing sugar, sifted together

For the raspberry ripple

  • We used Costa, from Waitrose and Ocado)
  • 200g frozen raspberries
  • 3 tbsp caster or granulated sugar

For the marshmallows

  • 500g granulated sugar
  • 1 generous tbsp liquid glucose (from the baking section of large supermarkets)
  • 20 gelatine leaves (33g in total – we used Costa)
  • 2 large free-range egg whites
  • 75g desiccated coconut
  • Small handful freeze-dried raspberries, quite finely crushed (ours came from souschef.co.uk)

You’ll also need… 

  • 30cm x 20cm x 5cm deep straight-sliced baking tin; electric mixer
  • Digital probe thermometer or sugar thermometer

Method

  1. To prepare the baking tin, brush it lightly all over with oil, then sift over the cornflower/icing sugar mixture, tipping the tin to coat inside evenly. Sift an extra-thick layer onto the bottom, then set aside.
  2. To make the raspberry ripple, soak the 2 gelatine leaves in cold water. Put the raspberries in a saucepan with the sugar and cook over a medium heat for a few minutes until completely broken down and syrupy. Press the pulp through a sieve into a bowl to give a smooth purée, then wipe out the saucepan, return the purée to the pan and set over a medium heat again. Once gently simmering, squeeze any excess water from the gelatine, then stir it into the purée until completely dissolved. Return to the bowl and leave to cool, then chill for 20 minutes until beginning to thicken and turn slightly gelatinous.
  3. Meanwhile make the marshmallows: put the sugar, liquid glucose and 200ml water in a heavy-based saucepan set over a low heat. Heat very gently until the sugar dissolves, then turn up the heat and cook until the mixture reaches 125ºC on the thermometer. Meanwhile, put the 20 gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water to soak. Once the syrup reaches about 110ºC put the egg whites in a large mixing bowl, or the bowl of a stand mixer, and whisk until they form stiff peaks (where the peaks of egg white won’t fall over on themselves when you lift out the beaters). As soon as the syrup reaches 125ºC, remove it from the heat and, with the mixer still whisking, pour the syrup gently into the egg whites, trying not to hit the side of the bowl or the beaters with the hot syrup, as it will solidify. Once all the syrup is incorporated, squeeze out the water from the gelatine leaves and add those too.
  4. Whisk the mixture for 10 minutes (use a timer, as it needs the full amount of time) until extremely thick and sticky. Remove the whisk attachment and scrape off the mallow mixture into the bowl. Working quickly, spoon half the mixture into the prepared tin, smoothing it down with a palette knife into the corners. Dollop over the raspberry purée, then add the remaining marshmallow over the top. Using a dinner knife, swirl the two mixtures together to get a ripple effect. The marshmallow will turn slightly pink, but thats fine. Sift over a little more cornflour/icing sugar mixture, then lay a piece of baking paper on top and press down to even up and flatten. Remove the baking paper, then put the tin somewhere cool and dry for 2-3 hours until completely set.
  5. To cut, run a knife around the edge of the marshmallow, then invert onto a board. Use a pastry brush to clean off the excess cornflour, then cut into squares. Tip the desiccated coconut onto a plate, then dip one side of each square into it. Pile up the marshmallows, scatter with freeze-dried raspberries and more coconut and serve, or pack into jars, sprinkle in a little more raspberry and coconut, and give as gifts.

delicious. tips

  1. Making marshmallows is messy – keep your kitchen surfaces clutter-free so they’re easier to clean afterwards.

    If you don’t have a stand mixer, you might find it best to get someone else to whisk the egg whites while you watch the sugar syrup.

    Like anything involving whisked egg whites, you’ll get the best results if you make these on a day that’s not too humid.

  2. Make up to 36 hours ahead, but don’t cut until you’re ready to pack or serve them.

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