Texas-spiced prime rib of beef

Texas-spiced prime rib of beef
  • Serves icon Serves 8-10
  • Time icon Hands-on time 30 min, barbecue time 2-2½ hours, plus overnight flavouring

This Texas-spiced roast beef recipe is cooked low and slow on the barbecue to ensure a soft texture and wonderful flavour. Feed a crowd and serve with a selection of these barbecue side dishes.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
331kcals
Fat
15.2g (6.6g saturated)
Protein
49g
Carbohydrates
0.9g (trace sugars)
Fibre
0.1g
Salt
1.4g
Calories
331kcals
Fat
15.2g (6.6g saturated)
Protein
49g
Carbohydrates
0.9g (trace sugars)
Fibre
0.1g
Salt
1.4g

Ingredients

  • 2-3 bone beef rib (2.5-3kg), French trimmed (see tip)

For the Texas spice rub

  • 2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 2 tsp coriander seeds
  • 2 tsp yellow mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 2 tsp black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp celery seeds
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tsp demerara sugar
  • 4 tsp sea salt

Method

  1. To make the spice rub, put a heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat. Add the cumin, coriander and yellow mustard seeds, the chilli flakes and black peppercorns, then toast for 2-4 minutes until fragrant. Don’t overdo it or the spices will be bitter. As soon as you can hear and see the mustard seeds starting to pop, take the pan off the heat. Transfer the spices to a bowl to cool.
  2. Grind the toasted spices and celery seeds in a pestle and mortar or spice mill, then stir in the garlic powder, sugar and salt. (The rub will keep in an airtight container, away from heat, for up to 1 month.)
  3. Use roughly 1 tbsp rub for every 500g meat. Rub the spice mix all over the meat, then leave overnight in the fridge, wrapped in cling film or in a sealable plastic bag. This will add depth of flavour and also form a good crust on the meat (known in barbecue circles as bark).
  4. When ready to begin, set up the barbecue for indirect cooking. When the coals are ready, scatter half the wood chips on to them.
  5. Put the beef rib on the rack, fat-side up, over the drip pan, away from the direct heat, then cover the barbecue with the lid. Adjust the vents – closed will extinguish the fire and fully open might make it too hot.
  6. Barbecue the beef for a minimum of 2-2½ hours, trying to keep the temperature inside the lid around 160-180°C. (If your barbecue doesn’t have a temperature gauge, insert a thermometer through the top vents now and then.) The beef is ready when a thermometer pushed into its centre reads 50°C for rare, 55-60°C for medium rare, 60-70°C for well done. To maintain the heat, add about 12 new coals per side every hour. Toss the rest of the wood chips on the coals after the first hour of grilling, but open the lid as little as possible while the meat is cooking.
  7. Once cooked to your liking, remove the meat from the barbecue and rest it, covered with foil, for 15 minutes. Carve the meat, then serve.

delicious. tips

  1. French trimming involves removing the meat and fat from the ends of the bones, leaving a neat, easy-carve joint. Ask your butcher or leave it untrimmed – it will take slightly longer to cook.

    You’ll also need a digital thermometer and several large handfuls of wood chips (such as applewood – from hotsmoked.co.uk), soaked for 1 hour in cold water.

    No Barbecue? Heat the oven to 200°C/fan180°C/gas 6. Cook the beef for 25 minutes, then turn the oven down to 170°C/fan150°C/gas 3½ and cook for 1½-2 hours until cooked to your liking.

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