Clementine and bay marmalade

Clementine and bay marmalade
  • Serves icon Makes around 1 litre
  • Time icon Hands-on time 60 min, simmering time 60 min, plus soaking and cooling

Our modern twist on classic British marmalade combines juicy clementines with fragrant bay leaves. Spread thickly on toast for a wonderful breakfast.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
71kcals
Protein
trace
Carbohydrates
17.8g (17.8g sugars)
Fibre
trace
Calories
71kcals
Protein
trace
Carbohydrates
17.8g (17.8g sugars)
Fibre
trace

Per 25g serving

Ingredients

  • 1.2kg clementines
  • 
7 lemons
  • 
6 bay leaves
  • 
1kg preserving sugar
  • 
8g sachet pectin (we used Tate & Lyle)

You’ll also need… 

  • Digital probe or sugar thermometer
  • 4 x 250g sterilised jam jars, waxed discs and sterilised lids (or cellophane circles and elastic bands to seal)

Useful but not essential

  • Jam funnel (for putting the marmalade into jars)

Method

  1. Halve the fruit and squeeze out the juice into a large preserving pan (or large saucepan) over a sieve, collecting the pips and pulp.
  2. Scoop out any remaining pulp and pips, then add to the pips and pulp in the sieve. Put the contents of the sieve on a piece of clean muslin or a new J-Cloth, then tie with string. Put in the pan with the juice and add the bay leaves.
  3. Finely slice the peel of 6-8 clementines (it will be visible in the finished marmalade, so take the time to slice it neatly). Add to the pan with 1 litre cold water.
  4. Put a small plate in the freezer. Bring the pan to the boil over a high heat. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes or until the peel softens. When the peel is soft, squeeze as much juice as you can from the muslin bag, using a wooden spoon to push it against the side of the pan, then discard the bag. Reduce the heat to low.
  5. Add the sugar and pectin. Heat gently, stirring occasionally, until the sugar has dissolved and the liquid is clear (about 5 minutes). Turn the heat to high and boil for 10-15 minutes until the marmalade reaches 106-107°C on a digital or sugar thermometer. Take off the heat, remove the plate from the freezer, spoon a little marmalade onto it, then return to the freezer for 1 minute. Remove and push the marmalade blob with your finger as if to move it on the plate. If it wrinkles, it has reached setting point. If it doesn’t, put the pan back on the heat and boil until the jam reaches 108°C, then try the wrinkle test again.
  6. Once the marmalade has reached setting point, take off the heat and leave to settle for 15 minutes – it will start to thicken slightly, which helps the peel and bay leaves distribute evenly, rather than rising to the top. Stir well, then pour into 3-4 sterilised jars – a jam funnel is useful, or you can use a jug or ladle, but be careful as the marmalade will be hot.
  7. Put a waxed disc on the marmalade surface while it’s still hot, then seal. Leave to cool. The marmalade will keep for up to a year in a cool, dark place.

delicious. tips

  1. Preserving sugar has large, slow-dissolving crystals that reduce the risk of burning and the need to stir too much, and produce less froth during boiling for a clearer result.

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