Lamb navarin stew
  • Serves icon Serves 4
  • Time icon Hands-on time 35 min, simmering time 2 hours

Navarin is a slow-cooked French lamb ragú that’s made by simmering lamb in a rich wine sauce until it’s pull-apart tender. Serve with green beans for a classic French dinner party dish.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
628kcals
Fat
28.2g (10.7g saturated)
Protein
37.8g
Carbohydrates
17.2g (7.4g sugars)
Fibre
9.4g
Salt
0.7g
Calories
628kcals
Fat
28.2g (10.7g saturated)
Protein
37.8g
Carbohydrates
17.2g (7.4g sugars)
Fibre
9.4g
Salt
0.7g

Ingredients

  • 600g lamb neck fillet, halved lengthways and cut into thick slices 
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • Glug olive oil
  • 5 fat garlic cloves, bashed
  • 50g tin anchovy fillets in oil (you can save the oil)
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • A few fresh flatleaf parsley sprigs, plus extra, chopped, to serve
  • 2 fresh rosemary sprigs
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 bottle (750ml) dry white wine
  • 210g pack mixed green beans and baby carrots
  • 200g pack baby turnips
  • 200g broad beans (podded weight), skinned
  • 135g pack baby leeks

You’ll also need…

  • Kitchen string

Method

  1. Toss the lamb and flour in a large food bag with seasoning. Put a large sauté pan or flameproof casserole with a glug of oil over a high heat. Brown half the lamb all over (don’t hurry the process) then put on a plate. Brown the remaining lamb, add it to the plate, then turn down the heat to medium.
  2. Fry the garlic for 1-2 minutes. Add the anchovies and tomato purée and cook for 2 minutes, stirring. Tie the herbs together with kitchen string to make a bouquet garni. Stir in the wine, then return the lamb along with the bouquet garni. Bring to the boil, turn down to the lowest setting so it’s just bubbling, then simmer for 1½-2 hours until the lamb is very tender.
  3. Towards the end of the cooking time, cook all the veg in a pan of boiling water: cook the carrots and turnips for 3 minutes, then add the green beans, broad beans and leeks and cook for 2 minutes more or until tender. Drain, reserving 150ml of the cooking water, and keep warm.
  4. Remove the meat from the pot with a slotted spoon and put in a warm serving bowl with most of the baby veg. Strain the sauce into a pan (discard the solids), add the 150ml cooking water, taste and season. Pour the sauce over the meat, top with the rest of the baby veg, then scatter with parsley to serve.

delicious. tips

  1. It’s important to brown the meat because it adds complex flavours to the finished dish. It takes time and a hot pan for the natural proteins and sugars in the meat to caramelise and brown, creating rich, savoury flavours. (The browning process is called The Maillard reaction and only happens at high temperatures.) Use a heavy-based pan and work in batches. If you over-crowd the pan, water released from the meat will cool it down and the meat will simmer in its own juices.

Subscribe

Fancy getting a copy in print?

Subscribe to our magazine
delicious. October

Rate & review

Rate

3.4 votes

Reviews

Share your thoughts...

Rate & review

Rate

3.4 votes

Subscribe to our magazine

Subscribe to delicious. magazine this month for a half price subscription

Subscribe

Download our digital version

Subscribe to the digital edition of delicious. magazine

October delicious.