Pickled peaches

Pickled peaches
  • Serves icon Makes 1.5kg (about 10 servings)
  • Time icon Hands-on time 20 mins

New to pickling? Grab a sterilised jar and have a go at Debora Robertson’s easy recipe for pickled peaches. They’ll go with everything…especially cheese.

Caught the pickling and fermenting bug? How about trying our simple pickled radishes, or making your own kimchi?

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
146kcals
Fat
0.1g (trace saturated)
Protein
1.2g
Carbohydrates
33.7g (33.7g sugars)
Fibre
2.4g
Salt
trace
Calories
146kcals
Fat
0.1g (trace saturated)
Protein
1.2g
Carbohydrates
33.7g (33.7g sugars)
Fibre
2.4g
Salt
trace

Ingredients

  • 1.2kg just ripe but still firm peaches (about 10)
  • Thinly pared zest and juice from an unwaxed lemon – use a sharp peeler and avoid the bitter white pith – you want thin strips about 2cm by 5cm
  • 1 litre white wine vinegar
  • 550g granulated sugar
  • 6 pink or black peppercorns
  • 3 thinnish peeled ginger slices
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ½ tsp yellow mustard seeds

You’ll also need

  •  Large Kilner-type jar, about 1.5 litres

Method

  1. First, scrub your jar in soapy water, rinse it well and put it in a low oven to stay warm. Cut a small cross in the skin at the base of each peach, then plunge them into boiling water, a few at a time, for 10 seconds. After this, plunge them into a bowl of iced water – the skins should now come away easily. Cut them in half, discard the stones and toss them in the lemon juice.
  2. To make the pickling liquid, put everything else bar the peaches in a large stainless steel or enamel pan (no aluminium – it doesn’t get on with vinegar) over a low heat and stir until the sugar dissolves. Now raise the heat and boil for 5 minutes, then lower the heat, add the fruit and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes. You want the peaches to be just soft when you pierce them with a sharp knife.
  3. Use a slotted spoon to lower the peaches into the warm jar, then simmer the pickling liquid until it’s slightly syrupy. Strain it over the peaches to cover (or leave the spices in) and seal the jar.
  4. They’re good to eat after a few hours, very good after 2 days and best after about 6 weeks. Try them with good bread and brie. Keep chilled once opened.

delicious. tips

  1. Don’t waste it: Save the pickling liquid after eating the peaches. Add a dash of pickle brine wherever you’d normally use vinegar, either in addition to or instead of other acids – in vinaigrettes and salad dressings, soups and stews, barbecue sauces and marinades for meat and fish.

Recipe By

Debora Robertson

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