Duck, pork belly and green olive terrine

Duck, pork belly and green olive terrine
  • Serves icon Makes 1 terrine (serves 10)
  • Time icon Hands-on time 30 min, oven time 1 hour 15-45 min, plus 48 hours marinating and pressing

Henry Harris’ duck terrine recipe is a great starter for Christmas or, indeed, a swish dinner party. The leftovers can be enjoyed as part of a buffet or for lunch the next day, too.

Henry says: “It’s only later, when the dish has cooled, been left for at least a day, then brought back to room temperature, that the cook’s endeavours are appreciated. Well seasoned with a few cornichons on the side and a piece of good baguette or toast, it’s pure savoury joy.”

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
385kcals
Fat
27g (9.1g saturated)
Protein
26.1g
Carbohydrates
2.7g (1.1g sugars)
Fibre
1.3g
Salt
2.3g
Calories
385kcals
Fat
27g (9.1g saturated)
Protein
26.1g
Carbohydrates
2.7g (1.1g sugars)
Fibre
1.3g
Salt
2.3g

Ingredients

  • 375g free-range pork belly, rindless
  • 1-2 small skinless free-range British duck breasts (about 250g)
  • 1 tsp coarse sea salt flakes
  • 25ml armagnac or brandy
  • 2 small garlic cloves, crushed
  • ½ tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 250ml red wine
  • 1 tbsp strong veal stock or ½ gel type beef stockpot (such as Knorr)
  • 625g free-range toulouse sausages or coarse pork sausages, skinned
  • 2 tbsp freshly chopped parsley
  • 150g pitted halkidiki olives or similar large green olives
  • 2 British rindless streaky bacon rashers

You’ll also need…

  • 1 litre terrine with lid
  • Digital probe thermometer

Method

  1. Dice the pork belly and duck into sugar lump-size cubes. Put in a bowl and season with black pepper, the salt, armagnac/brandy, garlic and thyme. Mix well, cover in a bowl and marinate in the fridge for 24 hours or at least overnight (see Henry’s tip).
  2. Put the wine and stock in a small pan, bring to the boil and reduce to 100ml. Chill until needed.
  3. The next day, transfer the meat to a large bowl. Add the sausagemeat, parsley and reduced wine. With clean hands, mix well to combine evenly.
  4. Heat the oven to 150°C/130°C fan/gas 2. Fill the terrine with the meat, adding the olives randomly as you go. The mix will stand slightly proud of the top of the terrine. Lay the bacon on top, press and cover with the lid.
  5. Put the terrine in a deep roasting tin and add boiling water to two thirds of the way up the side of the terrine. Transfer carefully to the oven. Cook for 1¼-1¾ hours until the temperature in the centre reaches 75°C on a digital probe thermometer.
  6. Remove from the oven and carefully lift the terrine from the water bath. Remove the lid and put cling film on top, then add a piece of rigid plastic or cardboard that fits just inside the rim. Put a few tins of tomatoes or beans on top to weigh down and press the terrine. Leave until cool, then chill in the fridge for 24 hours.
  7. The next day, take the terrine out of the fridge and leave for 2 hours until ready to serve. Serve with good bread and cornichons.

delicious. tips

  1. Henry says: “I like to marinate double the meat in step 1, then freeze half for up to 1 month to make a terrine on another day.”

  2. Start the terrine 48 hours before you want to serve it.

    The cooked terrine will keep in the fridge for up to 1 week.

  3. A cherryish beaujolais-villages or named beaujolais cru such as a fleurie or regnie.

Recipe By

Henry Harris

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