Quince jelly
  • Serves icon Makes about 500ml
  • Time icon Hands-on time 20 min, plus overnight straining and cooling

Make the most of quince’s short autumn season by stirring up a batch of delicious quince jelly. Try with roast game or simply spread on toast.

Desserts don’t get more autumnal than our pears in quince syrup.

 

Nutrition: Per tbsp

Calories
36kcals
Fat
no fat
Protein
0.1g
Carbohydrates
8.9g (8.9g sugars)
Fibre
trace
Salt
0g
Calories
36kcals
Fat
no fat
Protein
0.1g
Carbohydrates
8.9g (8.9g sugars)
Fibre
trace
Salt
0g

Ingredients

  • 1.5kg quinces (7-8), peeled and roughly chopped into 3-4cm pieces (leave in the cores/pips and reserve the peel)
  • 800g-1.2kg caster sugar
  • 10g fresh ginger (about a 5cm piece), peeled and thinly sliced
  • ½ vanilla pod, seeds scraped
  • 8 tbsp lemon juice

You’ll also need…

  • Large jelly bag or sieve lined with 3-4 layers of muslin
  • Large wide saucepan
  • Sterilised glass jars and lids

Method

  1. Put the quinces, their peel and 2 litres water in a large pan. Bring to the boil, then cover and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 2 hours or until the fruit is very soft. Spoon the quinces and liquid into a jelly bag/muslin set over a large pan. Set aside to strain for at least 12 hours or overnight. Don’t be tempted to squeeze it or the jelly will be cloudy.
  2. Once strained, measure the juice and pour into a large, wide saucepan – you should have about 1½ litres (see Don’t Waste It). Add 800g sugar per litre of juice to the pan along with the ginger, vanilla pod and seeds, and lemon juice. Set the pan over a medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Put a small plate in the freezer.
  3. Increase the heat to high and bring the liquid to a rapid boil. Cook for 30-40 minutes until the jelly is reduced and thickened. To test if it’s ready (at setting point), spoon a little liquid onto the cold plate. The jelly should set right away and wrinkle when you push it. If it doesn’t, cook for 10 minutes more, then test again.
  4. Remove the ginger and vanilla (see Don’t Waste It), then pour the jelly into hot, sterilised jars. Wipe the rims with a sterilised damp cloth, then close tightly with sterilised lids. Put the jars upside down on a tea towel for 1 hour to seal, then turn upright and leave to cool.

delicious. tips

  1. Find out how to sterilise jars with our handy guide.

    Don’t waste it: Reserve the quince pulp for quince paste or jam. Rinse and dry the vanilla pod, then use to flavour sugar.

  2. Store the sealed jelly in a cool dark place for up to 1 year. Keep in the fridge after opening and use within 1 month.

Recipe By

The Taverne Agency

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