Nectarine curd

Nectarine curd
  • Serves icon Makes about 750g
  • Time icon Hands-on time 30 min

Stone fruits are the gemstones of summertime. If you have plenty of nectarines to hand (and can resist eating them straight from the fruit bowl) a curd is a brilliant way to preserve their flavour. Spread it on toast, dollop onto scones or use to fill our tahini and nectarine sandwich cake.

This recipe works just as well with peaches too!

Bookmark our classic lemon curd recipe, too.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
230kcals
Fat
12g (7g saturated)
Protein
4.1g
Carbohydrates
25g (24g sugars)
Fibre
0.8g
Salt
0.3g
Calories
230kcals
Fat
12g (7g saturated)
Protein
4.1g
Carbohydrates
25g (24g sugars)
Fibre
0.8g
Salt
0.3g

Ingredients

  • 300g stoned, ripe nectarines (about 4)
  • 175g golden caster sugar
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 100g salted butter
  • 4 medium free-range eggs

Method

  1. Roughly chop the nectarines (no need to peel), then whizz to a fine purée in a blender or with a stick blender.
  2. Tip the nectarine purée into a saucepan and add the sugar, lemon juice and butter. Put over a medium heat and cook, stirring, until the butter has melted and the sugar has dissolved, without letting it boil or get too hot.
  3. Use a balloon whisk to beat the eggs in a large bowl. Gradually add the nectarine mixture to the eggs, whisking constantly until combined. At this point you can sieve the mixture back into the pan to remove any bits of nectarine skin, but you may find you don’t need to and can just tip it back into the pan. Or, if you think your mixture could be smoother, you can whizz again with a blender to get it really silky.
  4. Return the nectarine mixture to a low-medium heat and cook, stirring slowly but continuously with a rubber spatula, until it coats the back of a spoon and you can draw a line through it with your finger. It will continue to thicken as it cools.
  5. Scrape into a sterilised jar, packing it down to remove any air pockets. Keep in the fridge for 2 weeks or portion out and freeze for up to 3 months.

delicious. tips

  1. Easy swaps:  Try with other stone fruit – peaches and plums also work well. And if they’re not in season, use tinned peaches instead.

  2. When they’re in peak season and ripe, the nectarines will blend easily – if they’re a little firm, chop and cook them for 5 minutes with a splash of water before blending to help them break down.

Recipe By

Emily Gussin

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