Rhubarb, orange and rosemary curd

Rhubarb, orange and rosemary curd
  • Serves icon Serves 8
  • Time icon Hands-on time 45 min

Use this rhubarb and orange curd as a sponge cake filling, serve with scones and clotted cream or simply swirl through softened ice cream.

Nutrition: Per tbsp (12g)

Calories
22kcals
Fat
1.6 (1g saturated)
Protein
0.3g
Carbohydrates
1.6g (1.4g sugars)
Fibre
0.1g
Salt
trace
Calories
22kcals
Fat
1.6 (1g saturated)
Protein
0.3g
Carbohydrates
1.6g (1.4g sugars)
Fibre
0.1g
Salt
trace

Ingredients

  • 500g rhubarb, chopped (see tips)
  • Zest and juice 1 large orange
  • Juice 1/2 lemon
  • 4 large free-range eggs
  • 200g cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 2 fresh rosemary sprigs
  • 4 tsp cornflour
  • 150g caster sugar
  • Good splash grenadine (see tip)

Method

  1. Put the rhubarb in a medium pan with the orange zest and juice. Cook over a low heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until soft. Tip into a sieve set over a medium bowl and press with a wooden spoon to squeeze out all the juice – you should have about 250ml (discard the pulp). Add the lemon juice, then set aside to cool.
  2. Put the eggs, butter, rosemary, cornflour and sugar in a large pan. Add the cooled juice mixture, then mix with a balloon whisk over a low heat until the butter melts. Increase the heat a little and cook, whisking constantly, until you have a glossy, very thick curd.
  3. Strain into a clean mixing bowl (discard the rosemary), then add a good splash of grenadine for colour. Carefully pour into sterilised jars, then seal (see tips).

 

delicious. tips

  1. In the spring and early summer, field-grown rhubarb is at its most flavourful, but it no longer has the vibrant pink colour of the forced winter variety. Buy the pinkest stems you can find, then add a good splash of grenadine to boost the colour to a soft peachy-pink.

  2. The curd will keep in the fridge in sealed sterilised jars for up to 3 weeks. Once opened, consume within 3 days.

  3. When making curd cook until it’s thick and starting to resist the whisk (there should be a visible trail when the whisk is lifted). A good indication that you’re getting to the right point is when the curd gives off a lot of steam. It will thicken further as it cools and the butter solidifies. Don’t be tempted to speed up the process by increasing the heat – if it’s too high the curd will split. If you think it’s getting too hot, take the curd off the heat and whisk like mad to cool it a little, then return to the hob.

    To sterilise jars, wash them in soapy water, then rinse well. Heat the oven to 120°C/fan100°C/gas 1/2. Put the jars upside-down on a clean baking tray, then put in the oven for 10 min to dry out.

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