Pulled king oyster mushroom, peanut and chilli noodles

Pulled king oyster mushroom, peanut and chilli noodles

King oysters are prized for their meaty texture, which makes them an obvious choice in plant-based dishes. Here they’re strewn through a nutty, fragrant sauce inspired by Sichuan’s famous – and traditionally very porky – dan dan noodles.

Pulled king oyster mushroom, peanut and chilli noodles

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  • Serves icon Serves 2
  • Time icon Hands-on time 30 min

King oysters are prized for their meaty texture, which makes them an obvious choice in plant-based dishes. Here they’re strewn through a nutty, fragrant sauce inspired by Sichuan’s famous – and traditionally very porky – dan dan noodles.

Discover 400+ more plant-based recipes.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
479kcals
Fat
25g (3.7g saturated)
Protein
18g
Carbohydrates
43g (10g sugars)
Fibre
7g
Salt
4.7g

Ingredients

  • 4 large king oyster mushrooms
  • Thumb-size knob of ginger
  • 4 large or 6 small garlic cloves
  • Bunch spring onions
  • Vegetable oil to fry
  • 2 pak choi, bases trimmed and separated into leaves
  • 2 nests dried wheat or egg noodles
  • 2 tsp crispy chilli oil (or more to taste)

For the sauce

  • 1 tsp sichuan peppercorns, crushed
  • 2 heaped tbsp peanut butter, ideally deep-roast
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tsp dark soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp hoisin sauce
  • 1 tbsp chinkiang vinegar (see Know How)
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Method

  1. Put the mushrooms in a saucepan and boil a kettle. Pour the boiling water over the mushrooms, put over a medium heat and boil the mushrooms for 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, finely chop the ginger and garlic, finely slice the spring onions at an angle and separate into whites and greens. Mix the ingredients for the sauce together, then add enough water (around 150ml) to loosen it into a smooth sauce, the consistency of single cream. Set aside.
  3. Lift the mushrooms out of the water onto a board or plate (keep the water for boiling the noodles later). Use 2 forks to pull and shred the mushrooms into strands – you can keep them quite thick for a meatier texture or pull them into finer strands for a crispier texture (or a mixture of both).
  4. Heat a wok over a high heat with a generous dash of oil. Once smoking hot, add the pulled mushrooms and stir-fry for 3-5 minutes until golden all over. Lift them out and return to the plate/board.
  5. the pan of water back to the boil and cook the noodles according to the packet instructions. Meanwhile, add a dash more oil to the wok followed by the ginger, garlic and spring onion whites. Stir-fry for 30 seconds until aromatic, then return the mushrooms to the pan along with the pak choi. Stir-fry for a few more minutes, then pour in the sauce. Bubble furiously for a few minutes until the sauce thickens slightly and coats the ingredients – if it feels too thick, add a splash more water. You want it to be saucy enough to coat the noodles,  but thick enough to cling to them.
  6. Drain the noodles, toss them through the sauce, then divide between bowls. Scatter with the spring onion greens and drizzle with chilli oil.

Nutrition

Calories
479kcals
Fat
25g (3.7g saturated)
Protein
18g
Carbohydrates
43g (10g sugars)
Fibre
7g
Salt
4.7g

delicious. tips

  1. You can boil the mushrooms and make the sauce up to 24 hours in advance and keep both in the fridge.

  2. Boiling mushrooms sounds odd, but it’s actually a fantastic way to cook them. Their cell structure means you can boil them for hours and hours without them breaking down, so it’s an easy way to fully cook them without worrying about timings or drying them out.

    Chinkiang vinegar is a Chinese black rice vinegar with a caramel sweetness and fresh acidity. It requires a trip to an Asian supermarket or can be found online, but it’s well worth tracking down a bottle as it’s a core ingredient in many Chinese dishes (it also lasts forever in your pantry). If you can’t find any, regular rice vinegar can be used to add acidity instead.

     

Buy ingredients online

Recipe By

Tom Shingler

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