Trout terrine with capers, chopped egg, dill and chives

Trout terrine with capers, chopped egg, dill and chives
  • Serves icon Serves 6
  • Time icon Hands-on time 1 hour 30 min, oven time 25 min, plus 3-4 hours chilling

Served with fresh crusty bread and sharp pickled cucumbers, Gill Meller’s trout terrine is studded with chopped egg and capers.

Nutrition: per serving

Calories
460kcals
Fat
33.9g (17.4g saturated)
Protein
37g
Carbohydrates
1.3g (0.9g sugars)
Fibre
0.4g
Salt
1.1g
Calories
460kcals
Fat
33.9g (17.4g saturated)
Protein
37g
Carbohydrates
1.3g (0.9g sugars)
Fibre
0.4g
Salt
1.1g

Ingredients

  • 1 large or 2 small trout, gutted and scaled (about 1kg)
  • Large bunch fresh dill
  • 1 garlic clove, bashed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 100g unsalted butter, softened
  • Finely grated zest and juice 1/2 lemon
  • 2 large free-range eggs
  • 170g thick crème fraîche
  • 3 tbsp capers in brine, rinsed
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh chives
  • 200g smoked trout slices
  • New potatoes, good bread or toast and Gill’s pickled cucumber salad to serve

You’ll also need… 

  • 1 litre terrine or loaf tin, lined with cling film overhanging the edges

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas 4. Rinse the trout inside and out and pat dry with kitchen paper, then put onto a large piece of foil. Cut the coarser stems from the bunch of dill and put them in the cavity of the fish along with the garlic and bay leaves. Rub the butter all over the fish and sprinkle over the lemon zest. Season well with salt and pepper, then fold over the foil to enclose the fish. Crimp the edges tightly to keep the steam and juices inside. Bake the fish for 25 minutes or until just cooked through. (Check this by partially opening the foil and pushing the point of a sharp knife into the thickest part of the fish; the flesh should just come away from the bone.)
  2. While the trout is cooking, cook the eggs for 6-7 minutes in a small pan of boiling water. Drain and cool.
  3. When the trout is cool enough to handle, carefully open the foil parcel, taking care not to spill the buttery juices. Remove the skin from the fish (discard), then flake the flesh into a bowl, discarding any bones. Add the butter and roasting juices from the fish to the bowl with the crème fraîche, capers, chives and lemon juice. Peel and roughly chop the eggs and add to the bowl. Season, then gently combine – you don’t want to break up the fish/eggs much.
  4. Lay the smoked trout on a plate or board. Finely chop the remaining dill, then sprinkle over the smoked trout to give it an emerald green covering. Line the terrine with the smoked trout slices, laying the dill-covered side against the cling film-lined tin.
  5. Spoon the cooked trout and caper mixture into the lined terrine and even it out as best you can. Fold over any overhanging smoked trout to encase the filling completely. Fold over the overhanging cling film, then chill for 3-4 hours to set.
  6. To serve, use the cling film to gently ease the terrine out of the tin and turn out onto a chopping board. Remove the cling film and use a very sharp knife to cut into thin slices. Serve with new potatoes, crusty bread or toast and Gill’s cucumber salad.

delicious. tips

  1. This would also work well with salmon and smoked salmon in place of trout.

  2. The terrine can be made up to 24 hours ahead. Keep in its tin, wrapped, in the fridge.

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Rate & review

Rate

3.7 votes

Reviews

Read what others say...

  1. This did not turn out anything like the photo! There was far too much creme fraiche and it ended up looking like egg mayo with bits of trout, capers and chives. I thought it might firm up in the fridge but it did not! It was slop wrapped in smoked trout and my family refused to eat it.

    1. Hi Frances,

      Thank you for your comment. We have spoken to the food team and they have said the following:
      This is a recipe by Gill Mellor which was tested in the test kitchen and we didn’t find the same issue when we made it. However it is quite a soft set as most terrines are, but if the filling is chopped too finely it night alter the texture. It’s always worth using full fat dairy to help things set. If you’d prefer a firmer set, we would recommend using half philadelphia and half crème fraiche.

      Hope this helps and do let us know if you have any other questions.

      Thanks,
      The delicious. team

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